So you’ve decided to buy your very first pony and it’s going to be a Newfoundland pony.  Congratulations!  You are making a great choice and with proper care and attention and by selecting the right pony, you will have many years of enjoying this versatile and lovable friend.  You are also making a giant step toward helping to preserve this Critically Endangered breed.

The first and most important rule of thumb is simply this: TAKE YOUR TIME – DO NOT RUSH! AND IF YOU BUY A REGISTERED PONY MAKE SURE THAT THE SELLER PROVIDES YOU WITH A DATED AND SIGNED BILL OF SALE AS WELL AS A SIGNED COPY OF THE ORIGINAL REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE.  THIS WILL HELP YOU REGISTER THE PONY IN YOUR NAME AND KEEP NPS RECORDS UP TO DATE ON YOUR PONY.

All too often people make the mistake of buying a pony without undertaking proper research, weighing of various options and without making proper plans. Rash decisions and impulse buying can end in tears, disappointment or even injury from bites, kicks or rearing up.  It’s absolutely critical to take the time to locate a pony that will best suit your needs and that has the most appropriate temperament for you. Your pony will be with you for a long time!  Make sure that you’re both completely compatible.  It will pay dividends eventually.

You’ve probably spent some time already researching the Newfoundland pony on the Internet.   By now you know something about their history and their characteristics. You may have chatted on Face book or even talked to some owners.  You may have looked at some pictures of ponies that are up for sale. Go online again and look for tips on buying your first pony or common mistakes in buying your first pony.  Most of these sites offer sound and valuable advice – and it’s free!

Remember that pony owners love to show their ponies.  So if possible visit a local pony owner or two and ask for their help and advice.  Find out where they keep their ponies and what their daily routine entails. Ask them about vet care and where to obtain riding and handling instructors.  Remember too that while Newfoundland ponies have a reputation as easy keepers, there are certain things to be aware of in order to keep your pony healthy and contented.

On a final note, it might be possible to make an arrangement with a seller to lease a pony, or to take it on a trial basis for an agreed period of time.  That way you and your pony will get a chance to get acquainted without the pressure of an immediate final purchase.

 

For details on the best practices of caring for your pony Equine Canada has published a comprehensive code of best practice which can be down loaded at this link:

http://www.nfacc.ca/codes-of-practice/equine