The Newfoundland Pony has a rich and diverse background. It is intelligent, multi-talented, strong, hardy and a willing worker.

Please scroll down or click on a title under Table of Contents to learn more about the foundation breeds of the Newfoundland Pony.

Table of Contents

  1. Connemara
  2. Dartmoor
  3. Exmoor
  4. Fell
  5. Galloway
  6. Highland
  7. New Forest
  8. Section A: The Welsh Mountain Pony
  9. Section B: The Welsh Pony
  10. Section C: The Welsh Pony of Cob Type
  11. Section D: The Welsh Cob

Connemara


Height — Normally between 12.2-14.2 hh (128-148 cm).

Colours – Bay, black, brown, dun, grey with occasional roan, chestnut, palomino and dark eyed creams.

Characteristics – Good temperament, hardiness, staying power, intelligence, soundness, sure footedness, jumping ability.

Uses – Extraordinary jumping ability. Show pony. Riding pony. Farm work. Suitable for children or adults

General – The Connemara is the only remaining native Irish breed of equine and has an ancient history. It is named after Connemara, County Galway in the northwest of Ireland. It is said to have some Spanish blood in its background.

Glencarrig Eleanor – reproduced with the kind permission of Lanburn Connemaras

For more information about the Connemara, please visit the following web sites:

Connemara
Pony Society of Ireland
British
Connemara Pony Society
International
Museum of the Horse – Connemara
Lanburn
Connemaras

Dartmoor


Ascot Ring O Bells and her foal Fengate Just After Eight owned by Mr. & Mrs. T. L. Brown

Reproduced with the kind permission of the Dartmoor Pony Society and Mr. & Mrs. T. L. Brown

Photo Credit – Ross Brown

Height – Not exceeding 12.2 hh

Colours – Bay, brown, chestnut, gray, roan. Piebald and skewbalds are not allowed. Excessive white markings should be discouraged.

Characteristics – The Dartmoor is a very good looking riding pony; sturdily built, yet with quality.

Uses – Children’s riding and show pony. Jumping. Children and adults driving. Pleasure and competition.

General – The earliest reference to the Dartmoor Pony appeared in 1012. During the heyday of tin mines on Dartmoor, the ponies were used extensively for carrying the tin to the Stannary towns. When this finished, they were left to roam free apart from those required for farm work.

In 1898, the Polo Pony Society (now the National Pony Society) set up Local Committees to produce descriptions of each of England’s native breeds. Apart from the height, the original description of the Dartmoor is almost identical to the present breed standard. Five stallions and 72 mares were inspected and entered into the first Stud Book by the local committee. The height limits then were 14 hands for stallions and 13.2 for mares but very few ponies came near to these limits.

Shilstone Rocks Gallop

Reproduced with the kind permission of the Dartmoor Pony Society

Photo Credit – Miss. Tracy Elliot-Reep; www.traceyelliotreep.com

For more information about the Dartmoor, please visit the following web sites:

Dartmoor
Pony Society
International
Museum of the Horse – Dartmoor

Exmoor


Free living Exmoor Ponies near Simonsbath on Exmoor.

Mare in foreground is Knightoncombe Old Lady H8/103.

Reproduced with the kind permission of the Exmoor Pony Society and Sue Baker, the author of Survival of the Fittest – A Natural History of the Exmoor Pony.

Photo Credit – Sue Baker

Height – Naturally range from 11.2 – 13.1hh (117-135cms), with the majority around 12.2hh (127cms).

Colours – Bay, brown, or dun with black points and mealy muzzle; no white markings are accepted.

Characteristics – Toad eyes, good bone, a weatherproof coat and a snow chute on the tail. These primitive features suggest very little change since the Old Stone Age. Caves in the nearby Mendip Hills have revealed horse bones identical to modern Exmoor ponies from 12,000 years b.p.

Uses – Showing, riding, driving, jumping, long-distance riding, and riding and driving for the disabled. Their considerable strength makes them highly suited for driving but also means that they require a competent child rider rather than a novice.

General – While in others parts of Britain foreign equine blood was introduced which drastically altered the appearance of the British Hill pony, this did not occur on Exmoor. Most of the changes to ponies elsewhere in Britain took place in the last few hundred years and can be linked to the influences of major trade routes and ports which introduced new ideas and new animals. Exmoor, until very recently, was a forgotten place.

A few people on Exmoor followed the trend for crossing and “improving” the local pony but it is significant that their herds died out and left no legacy. The Exmoor ponies of today are descended from stock which was managed on the principle that nature held the best design and the introduction foreign blood led to the dilution of hardiness.

Exmoor Ponies at the Annual Breed Show

Reproduced with the kind permission of the Exmoor Pony Society and Sue Baker, the author of Survival of the Fittest – A Natural History of the Exmoor Pony.

Photo Credit – Sue Baker

For more information about the Exmoor, please visit the following web sites:

The Exmoor Pony Society International
Museum of the Horse – Exmoor

Fell (Ancestors Very Likely Included Galloways)


2004 Stallion Show at Dalemain, Cumbria UK

Murthwaite Look at Me with owner Thomas Capstick after winning the Championship

Photo Credit: Sue Millard

2004 Stallion Show at Dalemain, Cumbria UK

Townend Rally (black) and Glossopdale Smokey Flame (dark bay)

Photo Credit: Sue Millard

Ludworth Lady & 2004 filly Laurelhighland Sapphire – reproduced with the kind permission of Laurel Highland Farm

Copyright Laurel Highland Farm

Height – Not exceeding 14 hh (142.2 cms)

Colours – Black, brown, bay and grey. A star or a little white on or below the hind fetlock is acceptable.

Characteristics – A good specimen should be strong and active and display true pony characteristics, with the unmistakable appearance peculiar to mountain ponies – being lively and alert, with great bone. The Fell Pony should have a long stride at all paces, with good knee and hock action. They grow a fine summer coat and thick winter coat. The long manes, tails and particularly the feather should be straight and silky.

Uses — Pleasure and competitive riding, showing, driving, hunting, trekking and shepherding. Also, riding and driving for the disabled.

General – During the Roman occupation on the border between England and Scotland, auxiliary troops were brought in from other countries to help man Hadrian’s Wall, which separated the two countries. These auxiliaries would have brought along their own war stallions, many of these were probably left behind to breed and produce a mixture of types in northern England. A cross between these French, Fresian, German, Polish, or Spanish and the Celtic pony is believed to have helped shape many British native pony breeds, including the Fell (79AD to appoximately 420AD).

Lune Valley Dolly and 2003 colt Laurelhighland Bobby – reproduced with the kind permission of Laurel Highland Farm

Copyright Laurel Highland Farm

Lune Valley Dolly – reproduced with the kind permission of Laurel Highland Farm

Copyright Laurel Highland Farm

For more information about the Fell, please visit the following web sites:

The Fell Pony Society

The Fell Pony Museum

The Fell Pony Conservancy

International Museum of the Horse – Fell

The Fell Pony Society of North America

Fell Pony Society and Conservancy of the Americas

Galloway


General – The Galloway is extinct. The Galloway was said to be a diminutive horse resembling the Welsh Cob. It is very likely that the ancestors of the modern Fell included Galloways.

Daniel Defoe (1660-1731) wrote in his Tour Through Scotland, Letter XXI: “Besides the great number of sheep and runts [black cattle] which they breed here [in Galloway] they have the best breed of strong low horses in Britain, if not all of Europe, which we call pads, and from whence we call all truss-strong small riding horses Galloways; these horses are remarkable for being good pacers, strong, easy goers, hardy, gentle, well broke, and above all, they never tire, and are very much brought up in England on that account.”

Youatt, 1829 wrote: “The pure galloway was said to be nearly fourteen hands high, and sometimes more; of a bright bay or brown, with black legs, small head and neck, and peculiarly deep and clean legs. Its qualities were speed, stoutness, and surefootedness over a very rugged and mountainous country.’ www.fellpony.f9.co.uk/fells17_18C/galloways.htm

Highland


Dunedin May Rose – Breeder/Owner A. Mitchell

Reproduced with the kind permission of The Highland Pony Society

Photo Credit – Dr. T. D. McArdle, Highland Pony Gazette

Height – 13 – 14.2 hh (132-148 cms)

Colours – A range of duns-mouse, yellow, grey, cream. Also grey, brown, black and occasionally bay and liver chestnut with silver mane and tail. Many ponies have dorsal stripes and some have zebra markings on legs and shoulder stripes. A small star is acceptable but other white markings are discouraged. The foal coat colour often changes. Many ponies change colour gradually as they grow older (especially those with grey hairs interspersed with the original colour). Broken colours are not allowed.

Characteristics – The winter coat consists of a layer of strong badger-like hair over a soft dense undercoat, which enables this breed of pony to live out in all weathers. This coat is shed in the spring to reveal a smooth summer coat. The essential hardiness is combined with a kindly nature and even temperament.

Uses — Performance, shows, cross-country and long distance of medium length and difficulty, driving, jumping to 4’, back packing and trekking over difficult terrain.

General – The Highland Pony is one of the two native breeds of the Scottish Highlands and Islands. It has adapted to the variable and often severe climatic and environmental conditions of Scotland.

Tower Fraoch – Breeder/Owner J. Hendrie

Reproduced with the kind permission of The Highland Pony Society

Photo Credit – Dr. T. D. McArdle, Highland Pony Gazette

For more information about the Highland, please visit the following websites:

The Highland Pony Society International
Museum of the Horse – Highland

New Forest


Wayland Cranberry – Owner by Mary Bryant – Riden by Elaine Crouch

Reproduced with the kind permission of the New Forest Pony Breeding and Cattle Society

Highfox Forever – Bred by Paul and Diane Hadwen

Reproduced with the kind permission of the New Forest Pony Breeding and Cattle Society

Height – Up to 14.2 hh; although there is no official lower limit, they seldom go below 12hh.

Colours – The most prominent colors are bay, brown and gray followed by chestnuts, roans and blacks. Limited white markings are allowed on the head and legs. Blue-eyed creams, piebalds and skewbalds are not permitted.

Characteristics – The New Forester displays free, straight movement, plenty of bone, strong rear quarters, good depth of body and should be of riding type, with a good deal of substance. The larger ponies, while narrow enough for children, are capable of carrying adults. The smaller ponies, although not up to so much weight, usually show more quality than the larger animals. The New Forest has always been valued for its docility, hardiness, strength and sureness of foot.

Uses – Good jumpers, gymkhana events, mounted games, dressage, polo, long-distance and cross-country riding, carrying the disabled, racing over rough terrain.

General – The New Forest is a British native breed and the first record of these ponies appears in the Forest Law of 1016. Thoroughbred and Arab blood was introduced from time to time to improve looks and increase height but it was not until the end of the nineteenth century that systematic attempts were made to improve the breed.

Applewitch Pure Magic – Owned by Kay Bailey

Reproduced with the kind permission of the New Forest Pony Breeding and Cattle Society

Furzley Brocaide aged 4 weeks and Dam Sophia – Bred by Sandra Kilford

Reproduced with the kind permission of the New Forest Pony Breeding and Cattle Society

Photo Credit – Kay Bailey

For more information about the New Forest, please visit the following web sites:

The New Forest Pony Breeding and Cattle Society International
Museum of the Horse — New Forest

Section A: The Welsh Mountain Pony


Granby Tom Thumb

Reproduced with the kind permission of Barb Brown

Photo Credit – Barb Brown

Height — The height should not exceed 12 hh (121.9 cm)

Colour — All colours are permitted, from bay to brown, chestnut and roan, only piebald and skewbald are excluded.

Characteristics — The head of the Mountain Pony should be small, with neat pointed ears, big bold eyes and a wide forehead. The jaw should be clean cut, tapering to a small muzzle; the profile may be concave or ‘dished’ but never convex or too straight. The neck should be of good length and well carried with shoulders sloping back to a clearly defined wither. The limbs must be set square with good flat bone and round dense hooves. The tail set high and gaily carried. Action must be quick, free and straight from the shoulder, knees and hocks well flexed with straight and powerful leverage well under the body. Good temperament.

Uses — The Mountain Pony makes the ideal child’s pony. They can be seen ridden and driven all over the world and are equally at home in the cold of Canada or the heat of Africa.

General – Bred in the mountains and wild regions of Wales, ‘survival of the fittest’ has ensured a sound constitution, iron hard limbs and great intelligence.

Alderdale Black Satin – Owned and driven by Marsha Himler

Reproduced with the kind permission of Marsha Himler

Photo Credit – B. Jones

Section B: The Welsh Pony


Thornbeck Atlantic Promise

Reproduced with the kind permission of Barb Brown

Photo Credit – Barb Brown

Height – The height should not exceed 13.2 hh. (137.2 cm).

Colour – All colours are permitted, from bay to brown, chestnut and roan, only piebald and skewbald are excluded.

Characteristics – The general description of the Welsh Mountain Pony can be applied to the Welsh Pony. Greater emphasis is placed on riding pony
qualities while retaining the true Welsh quality with substance.

Uses — The Welsh Pony can hold its own among the top class riding ponies both in performance competitions and in the show ring. A natural jumping ability combined with the temperament of their Welsh Mountain Pony forebears make the Welsh Pony second to none in whatever field his young rider may choose.

General – For generations these ponies were the hill farmers’ main means of transport, herding sheep and wild ponies over rough and mountainous country. They had to be hardy, balanced and fast to survive.
Only the best were bred.

Section C: The Welsh Pony of Cob Type


Gallod Coron Tlws

Reproduced with the kind permission of the owner Barb Brown

Photo Credit – Barb Brown

Height – The height should not exceed 13.2 hh. (137.2 cm).

Colour – All colours are permitted, from bay to brown, chestnut and roan, only piebald and skewbald are excluded.

Characteristics – The Welsh Pony of Cob Type, Section C, is the stronger counterpart of the Welsh Pony, but with Cob blood.

Uses – Active, surefooted and hardy, they are ideal for many purposes both for adults and children. Like all the Welsh Breeds, they are natural jumpers. They also excel in harness.

General – Their true worth as a dual purpose animal has been fully realized in recent years, and their numbers have increased accordingly.

Section D: The Welsh Cob


Avonvalley Dow Jones

Reproduced with the kind permission of the owners Keith and Jenny Parsons

Photo Credit – Barb Brown

Height – The height should exceed 13.2 hhh. (137 cm): There is no upper limit.

Colour – All colours are permitted, from bay to brown, chestnut and roan, only piebald and skewbald are excluded.

Characteristics – The general character is the embodiment of strength, hardiness and agility. The head shows great quality with Pony character: bold prominent eyes, a broad forehead and neat, well set ears. The body must be deep, on strong limbs with good “hard wearing” joints and an abundance of flat bone. Action must be straight, free and forceful, the knees should be bent and then the whole foreleg extended from the shoulders as far as possible in all paces, with the hocks well flexed, producing powerful leverage.

Uses – The Welsh Cob is a good hunter and a most competent performer in all competitive sports. They have had great success in the international driving world.

General – Aptly described as “the best ride and drive animal in the World”, the Welsh Cob has been evolved throughout many centuries for his courage, tractability and powers of endurance.

CWM Felen Golden Eclipse

Reproduced with the kind permission of the owner Dorothy Robertson

Photo Credit – Barb Brown

Thornbeck Brenin

Reproduced wihte kind permission of the owner Barb Brown

Photo Credit – Barb Brown

For more information about the Welsh Ponies and Cobs, please visit the following web sites:

The Welsh Pony and Cob Society
International Museum of the Horse – Welsh